Elective Courses


  • BIOL 5111: Genomics in Medicine
    • Credits: 3

    The completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 began a revolution in the treatment of human disease. More than 10 years later, the promise of personalized genome-guided medical treatment is becoming reality. This course will explore how genomic information has enhanced our understanding of human genetic variation and disease susceptibility. Students will become familiar with current research as presented by researchers currently working in relevant fields. Students will complete an independent project focused on a particular disease topic, integrating literature review with new analyses of published data.

  • BIOL 5312: Biostatistics
    • Credits: 3

    Biostatistics is an important part of the research activities related to biological and medical issues. Statistics is used to analyze phenomena with random properties and is often essential to draw the right conclusions based on a data set. The course will be designed to cover different statistical methods for data analysis mainly applied to medical and biological problems. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students with interests in medicine and biomedical research will benefit most from the course. However statistical methods that can be applied to behavioral science and ecology will also be covered.

  • BIOL 82X0: Genom Analytics: Special Seminar
    • Credits: 3

    Course will focus on genome analytics and with an extensive writing component.

  • CHEM 8201: The Chemistry of Natural Products
    • Credits: 3

    Biogenetic classification, classical and modern synthetic approaches to polyketides, steroids, terpenes, and alkaloids.

  • CHEM 8304: Nanomaterials Chemistry and Physics
    • Credits: 3

    This course will cover the key chemical/physical properties of nanomaterials as well as nanomaterials characterization and synthesis for graduate students. The goal of this class is to help students get familiar to the important concepts associated with the confined dimensionality in nanomaterials and apply these concepts to understand unique electronic/optical properties of nanomaterials and the thermodynamics/kinetics of forming nanomaterials. The course is organized with four modules: 1) Introduction to Nanoscience - Physical and Chemical Concepts, 2) Characterization of Materials at Nanoscale, 3) Fabrication of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, and 4) Case Study of Specific Nanomaterials.

  • CHEM 5505: Advanced Polymer Structure and Properties
    • Credits: 3

    Polymers are ubiquitous in many new (scaffolds for tissue engineering, hip replacements) and old (textiles, engineering resins, flocculants) applications, and are often used in composites with inorganic materials. In order to better understand the use and novel developments of polymers, this course will provide the fundamentals of synthesis, polymer structure/property relationships, and characterization methods.

  • ENG 8706: Advanced Study in Rhetoric and Composition
    • Credits: 3

    Advanced study of topics in rhetoric and composition.

  • EPBI 5101: Fundamentals of Epidemiology
    • Credits: 3

    This course introduces descriptive and analytical epidemiology. Concepts and methods used in public health are covered, with emphasis on the calculation and interpretation of indices of community health; morbidity and mortality rates; age-adjustment; and risk ratios, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of screening tests. Surveyed are epidemiological research designs, surveillance systems, and evidence-based practice guidelines. Note: This is an introductory course for students in public health and related fields.

  • HPM 8013: Reasearch Methods in Health Policy
    • Credits: 3

    The purpose of this course is to introduce and engage students in research methods used in health policy research, including both the development of policies and the evaluation of existing policies. The course will cover both qualitative methods such as policy analysis, interviewing, focus groups and content analysis, as well as quantitative methods such as legal mapping studies, secondary data analysis, and some economic evaluations. The course will explain and engage these methodologies, but students are not expected to carry out statistical analysis. Lastly, the course will require students to think about the results generated in such research and effective ways in which to communicate such findings to the appropriate audience. The course is intended for students who will be working on policy research or social science research that may include a policy component. Learning objectives will be met through didactic lecture, a formal policy analysis paper, individual homework assignments, and a final exam.

  • HPM 8008: Health Economics
    • Credits: 3

    This class will promote the understanding of core health economics theory, using research literature and case studies to examine how economic theory has shaped the development and understanding of the healthcare systems and policies in the U.S. A background in economic theory will help students to understand and interpret research based on those theories. Health Economics is intended to promote an understanding of how these theories fit into the formation and changes in our healthcare structure. It will also offer an economic perspective on health behavior, such as how discounting relates to risk behavior and how risk preference relates to insurance purchase.

  • HRPR 8101: Bioethics and Ethical Decision-Making
    • Credits: 3

    This seminar course is designed to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue and approaches for ethical decision-making. Students from many health disciplines can engage in bioethical discourse. Students can increase their understanding of ethics within the context of research and health care, identify and consider moral and professional values and preferences when collecting information and making decisions, and recognize the importance of collaboration when making bioethical decisions. The student reflects on personal decision-making through an exploration of the results of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).

  • MKTG 5001: Marketing Management/Strategy
    • Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how firms develop marketing strategies to create and manage the creation of meaningful offers that are valued by consumers for the purpose of developing and maintaining customer relationships. Initially, we will address the evolution of market systems at the macroeconomic level and the role that marketing plays in bridging the gap between the production and consumption sectors of the economy. Subsequently, we will explore how firms develop strategies to create customer value through product management, pricing, marketing channels, supply chain management, customer relationship management and communications directed to buyers and also develop an understanding of how buyers acquire, consume and dispose of these goods and services.

  • PHIL 5216: Philosophy in Science
    • Credits: 3

    Basic issues in the current philosophy of science, and particularly various accounts of such key notations of science as hypotheses, confirmation, laws, causation, explanation, and theories.

  • PHIL 5249: Ethics in Medicine
    • Credits: 3

    This course is an upper-level introduction to the field of biomedical ethics. It begins with a survey of relevant ethical theories (utilitarian, Kantian, virtue ethics, the ethics of care, casuistry and principalism). Most of the course will consist of detailed, in depth discussions of particular issues in clinical medical ethics and research bioethics: informed consent, abortion, assisted reproduction, embryonic stem cell research, genetic technologies including testing, stem cell research and GMOs, end of life care, public health ethics and justice in the provision of health care.

  • STAT 5001: Quantitative Methods for Business
    • Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce contemporary elementary applied statistics to provide an appreciation for the uses of statistics in business, economics, everyday life, as well as hands-on capabilities needed in other courses and professional employment.